Four National and International talks by University of Lethbridge Digital Humanities students

A quick catchup post: this semester is shaping up to be a blockbuster in terms of University of Lethbridge Digital Humanities students’ success in national and international refereed conferences.

The semester began strongly with Kayla Ueland’s presentation “Reconciling between novel and traditional ways to publish in the Social Sciences” at the Force 2015 conference in Oxford this past January. Ueland is a graduate student in Sociology and a Research Assistant in the Lethbridge Journal Incubator.

We have also just heard that four students and recent graduates of the University of Lethbridge’s Department of English have had papers accepted at the joint meeting of the Canadian Society for the Digital Humanities/Société canadienne des humanités numériques and the Association for Computers and the Humanities.

The students and their papers are:


Four National and International talks by University of Lethbridge Digital Humanities students

A quick catchup post: this semester is shaping up to be a blockbuster in terms of University of Lethbridge Digital Humanities students’ success in national and international refereed conferences.

The semester began strongly with Kayla Ueland’s presentation “Reconciling between novel and traditional ways to publish in the Social Sciences” at the Force 2015 conference in Oxford this past January. Ueland is a graduate student in Sociology and a Research Assistant in the Lethbridge Journal Incubator.

We have also just heard that four students and recent graduates of the University of Lethbridge’s Department of English have had papers accepted at the joint meeting of the Canadian Society for the Digital Humanities/Société canadienne des humanités numériques and the Association for Computers and the Humanities.

The students and their papers are:


Abstract: Is there a text in this edition? On the implications of multiple media and immersive technology for the future of the “scholarly edition.”

By Daniel Paul O’Donnell, University of Lethbridge, James Graham, University of Lethbridge, Catherine Karkov, University of Leeds, Roberto Rosselli Del Turco, Università degli studi di Torino. To be read November 23, 2012 European Society for Textual Scholarship, Amsterdam. In the last decade, advances in technology have taken the edition out of the library. Where there […]

Shit humanists say: A response to “English Profs want to control the internet”

This is a response to “English Profs want to control the Internet”, by somebody who apparently doesn’t want their name front-and-centre. It is slightly modified from the comment I submitted, but since this is actual and it is in a moderation queue, I decided to post it here as well. I wouldn’t mind returning to the topic, to be honest.

I find the genre of this piece (“humanists say the darndest things”) about as tiring as the debate about tweeting conferences. It is pretty easy to make fun of ongoing conversations in any discipline you don’t normally follow, especially if, as others have pointed out, you don’t actually read the things you are linking to, let alone the broad context in which they are being written. Yesterday the Chronicle was reporting on scientists who peer review their own articles by creating fake email addresses and even entire identities. Yet I can resist the temptation to suggest that this must mean that all natural and medical sciences are one large circle jerk.

Read the rest of this entry »


Linked data, open data: Towards a semantic web of Anglo-Saxon England

International Society of Anglo-Saxonists (ISAS), July 29th-August 2, 2013, Dublin The Visionary Cross would like to propose a roundtable or three paper panel on linked and open data in Anglo-Saxon studies for ISAS 2013. The goal of this panel would be to assess the current state of practice in the development of linked and open […]

Call for Papers: Cultural, Textual, and Material Heritage in the Digital Age: Projects and Practices

The twentieth International Medieval Congress, Leeds, 1-4 July 2013 The rise of the Digital Humanities as an international, cross-disciplinary approach to humanistic scholarship presents exciting new challenges and opportunities. Perhaps one of the most exciting of these is the convergence of interest among textual editors, art historians, archaeologists, museum and library curatorial staff, government agencies, […]

Call for participants: New Digital Paradigms for Anglo-Saxon Studies

International Society of Anglo-Saxonists (ISAS), July 29th-August 2, 2013, Dublin Anglo-Saxon studies, and medieval studies more generally, has always been a pioneering discipline in the use of digital technology. From early projects like the Dictionary of Old English and Electronic Beowulf through more recent contributions such as the Anglo-Saxon Cluster and DigiPal, Anglo-Saxonists have always […]
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox

Join other followers: