An interesting issue with the *nix ls command, or, why you should never begin a filename with a hyphen

In which I discover an odd error using ls and learn how to solve it.


Cædmon Citation Network – Week 5

Hi all!

Painfully short blog entry this week, I’m afraid. A lot has been accomplished this week, but there is not a lot to report.

The bibliography has been completed, with the final count being approximately 700 pieces of Cædmon scholarship. This number may increase or decrease as I read through the actual works. Some may have nothing to do with Cædmon (I erred on the side of having to much rather than too little), and others may point me in the direction of something I might have missed.

I have also begun to search out access to the pieces that make up the bibliography. Read the rest of this entry »


Problems with Cisco Anyconnect on Ubuntu 14.04 (Breaks Internet Connections)

This blog is about resolving an issue I had after installing Cisco Anyconnect, the U of L’s VPN client.

This is an aide memoire for me, but might be useful to others. The information comes from, with the first being most useful for this particular case:


Problems with Cisco Anyconnect on Ubuntu 14.04 (Breaks Internet Connections)

This blog is about resolving an issue I had after installing Cisco Anyconnect, the U of L’s VPN client.

This is an aide memoire for me, but might be useful to others. The information comes from, with the first being most useful for this particular case:


Web browsers

Web browsers are (quite literally) the defining feature of the World Wide Web, which was invented when Tim Berners-Lee released the first version of his HTML browser (World Wide Web) on Christmas day 1989. In other words, they are what makes the web the web.

For a variety of historical reasons, users tend to treat web browsers as utility-grade software—a part of the operating system they expect our devices to have already installed rather than a piece of software you choose to install and run. But more than one kind of browser exists and there are differences between them. Sometimes one browser is better than another for certain tasks or sites. You should know what browser you are using and you should make sure you have some alternates installed.


Essential computer tools and skills for humanities students

The Digital Humanities is a hot new field within the Arts. Its practitioners are often at the forefront of developing new topics within ICT itself.

But what about if you are not interested in the Digital Humanities? Or are interested in them, but don’t consider yourself particularly computer literate? What are the computer skills you need to thrive in the traditional humanities or get started in DH?

This is the first in what I hope will be a series of tutorials on basic computer skills and tools for students of the Humanities. It should be of use to those just beginning their undergraduate careers, for graduate students hoping to professionalise their research and study, and for researchers and teachers who have other things to do that follow the latest trends and software.

Read the rest of this entry »

Code for table of contents in text pattern

Use the following to put in a table of contents in a text pattern page.

<div id="TOC">
   <txp:soo_toc label="Contents" labeltag="h3"/>
</div>

The code will build a TOC for every header that has an IDREF. An example would look like this: h3(#thisIsTheID).

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Managing class webpages and mailing lists at the University of Lethbridge

For years, every class at the University of Lethbridge has been given webspace and a mailing list. While the mailing list is well-known to instructors (it is the list “XXXXNNNNx@uleth.ca” that you use to make announcements to the class as a whole), the webspace is far less well known. This document (mostly a reminder to myself) shows you how you can use online tools to manage this.


Two tips that will improve the lives of all students and researchers in the Humanities and Social Sciences

Introduction

A recent question on Linked-in asked how important the formatting guides for journals are in preparing submissions.

Although this question was about submitting to journals, its context is relevant to all students and researchers in the Social Sciences and Humanities (although the problem also exists in the sciences, the solutions there are in some cases different). Humanities and Social Science study in University is largely about the collection of bibliography and the presentation of findings in written form. And that invariably involves questions of formatting: different disciplines and even different journals (or for students, instructors) within a discipline can require work to be submitted in quite different styles.


How to do a table of contents in text pattern

My teaching pages are served out using Textpattern, a relatively light CMS that uses textile wiki-like markup.

Because adding an excerpt by hand wrecks the syndication of this site through Wordpress to my other blog, I don’t usually add a text summary. Instead, I do something similar to the Wikipedia or Wordpress: I begin articles with an abstract like first paragraph, then include a table of contents, then have the rest of the body.

I used to make up these tables of content by hand, cursing all the time that Textile wasn’t XML. Then I discovered soo_toc, a Textpattern plugin that builds tables of contents dynamically. Joy!

Of course, now I need to remember to add the template that calls the TOC to each page (as I type this, I wonder if there might not be a simple variable I could develop that does this, but that’s for later). Read the rest of this entry »


Mounting University of Lethbridge “P” and “W” drives under Linux

Here’s how to find the “P” and “W” drives at the University of Lethbridge.

“P” drives

Your “P” drive is the windows share that represents your standard network desktop (i.e. the thing you see if you log into a classroom or other computer on campus).

Read the rest of this entry »

Journal Incubator Poster (Digital Humanities 2013)

There was a lot of interest in the Lethbridge Journal Incubator project poster yesterday at the Digital Humanities 2013 conference poster session at the University of Nebraska.

A thumbnail image of the poster comes below (there is also a letter-sized version). You can get the original PDF here

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Hack cross references in Workflowy

Here’s a way of linking between entries (across the list hierarchy) in Workflowy It is a terrible (and unnecessary) hack, but in the absence of a smoother approach, it works:

1) Hover the mouse over the bullet for the item you want to cross-link to and select “Share” from the list that appears

2) Choose “view” or “edit” in the dialogue (since this is for internal use, I’d say choose “edit”

3) Copy the link that appears to your clipboard: you can now use this as a reference to this item anywhere in workflowy by simply pasting it into a new item

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Embedding Workflowy and/or Hackpad in a WordPress site

I am experimenting with using a private Wordpress installation as a kind of personal logbook, diary, notebook, and to-do list: i.e. the kind of book that business keep beside their cash registers to help them remember what they need to do.

The one thing Wordpress lacks that is necessary for such an installation is a way of making instant and realtime edits—for example to check off things in a todo list.

Since other applications exist out there that do allow you to do this, I began to experiment with inserting them into my wordpress install.

Two excellent applications for this kind of thing are Workflowy and Hackpad

So, how to integrate them? The answer is very easy:

Hackpad

Hackpad makes embedding extremely easy: they have an embed button that tells you the code to use, e.g.

<script src=“https://hackpad.com/<string>.js”></script><noscript><div>View <a href=“https://hackpad.com/<string>.js”>To-Do</a></div></noscript>

Workflowy

The same method might work with Workflowy, since it is also java based, though I haven’t experimented with it yet. In the meantime, you can also just embed the workflowy page in Wordpress as an object.

  1. Select “Share” for the list you want to embed
  2. In the popup, make sure that editing permissions as assigned
  3. copy the link into the following embed code.
<object data=“https://workflowy.com/shared/<shareStringWorkflowyGives>/” width=“1000” height=“3600”> <embed src=“https://workflowy.com/shared/<shareStringWorkflowyGives>/” width=“1000” height=“3600”> </embed> Error: Embedded data could not be displayed. </object>

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Spreadsheet formulas for converting letter grades to percentages and percentages to letter grades

Below are links to spreadsheets containing my standard formulas for converting from letters grades to percentages and vice versa.

I use the first formula (letter grades to percentages) when I am marking work qualitatively (e.g. essays, translations, and other things that are not easily scored numerically), but need a number to use in calculating the final grade; I use the second formula (percent to letter grade) when I am calculating the final grade for submission to the University (the University recrds only letter grades). With some tweaking, you could use this second formula to convert to grade points or to other systems (e.g. First/Second class, and so on).

There are two versions of each formula: a dynamic and a static version. The static version is simply the formula I use in my spreadsheets and it is based on the letter:percentage equivalences defined elsewhere on my website. The dynamic version is built within the spreadsheet using numbers supplied by the user. This has the advantage of being adaptable, but it has the disadvantage of requiring you to copy more cells into your own spread sheet if you want to use it (because it depends on internal references, you need to copy both the formula and the table of equivalences in the stylesheet). In both cases, there are instructions (hopefully clear) on how to use the formulas in your own grade spreadsheets.

Here is the text of the static formula (it assumes its data is coming from cell A32 in the first case and A35 in the second. The easiest way of adapting it to your own uses is to paste the formulas into cells B32 or B35. After you have done that they should autoatically change depending on where you place them in the spreadsheet):

=IF(A32="A+",1,IF(A32="A",0.92,IF(A32="A-",0.88,IF(A32="B+",0.84,IF(A32="B",0.8,IF(A32="B-",0.76,IF(A32="C+",0.72,IF(A32="C",0.68,IF(A32="C-",0.64,IF(A32="D+",0.6,IF(A32="D",0.56,IF(A32="F",0.334,A32))))))))))))

=IF(A35<0.495,"F",IF(A35<0.575,"D",IF(A35<0.615,"D+",IF(A35<0.655,"C-",IF(A35<0.695,"C",IF(A35<0.735,"C+",IF(A35<0.775,"B-",IF(A35<0.815,"B",IF(A35<0.855,"B+",IF(A35<0.895,"A-",IF(A35<0.935,"A","A+")))))))))))

Open/Libre office version: http://ubuntuone.com/1iBn3HjozhiNpzEV4W7siQ

Excel Version (converted by Open Office): http://ubuntuone.com/0qcsHBnCKcHD5wrkT5bSTw

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