Archaeology as Installation: Jerusalem’s Temple Mount and the Davidson Center for Exhibition and Virtual Reconstruction. Lecture by Lisa Snyder (UCLA). November 24.

Lisa Snyder from the UCLA Institute for Digital Research and Education will be in Lethbridge to speak to my Digital Humanities class on Monday November 23, 2015. She has also agreed to give a second talk, “Archaeology as Installation: Jerusalem’s Temple Mount and the Davidson Center for Exhibition and Virtual Reconstruction.”

The talk will take place on Tuesday 24, 2015 10:50-12:05 in Room L1170a (Linc building).

At the heart of archaeology is interpretation, and one of the greatest challenges for an archaeologist is communicating the results of their excavations with both the general public and other researchers. In 1999, the Israel Antiquities Authority turned to the Urban Simulation Team at UCLA to address this challenge through a landmark installation for the Davidson Center in Jerusalem. Since the Center opened in 2001, visitors to the site have had the opportunity to take a virtual tour of the reconstruction model with an archaeologist guide in an interactive Read the rest of this entry »


English 4400/5400 Digital Humanities. Forms of assessment

Here are descriptions of the main forms of assessment in this course.

Blogs

Most weeks you will be expected to write a blog entry on your reading and/or research for the course, interesting examples of digital technology used in the context of humanities or arts research, teaching, or practice, and the like. See also my more general page, About blogs

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English 3450a: Old English (Fall 2015)

Note: This is a draft syllabus and is subject to revision before the last day of the add/drop period.


English 4400n/5500n: Digital Humanities (Fall 2015)

About the course

English 4400n: Digital Humanities is a senior seminar on the digital revolution and the effect it is having on the way we communicate, research, and teach. Most of the course will be concerned with the mechanisms and effects of what we might describe as the second Internet revolution—the growth of cloud-based, often socially-network-oriented, services, applications, and repositories that are radically changing economic, social, and research culture and practices.

By the end of the course, students should have

  • A grounded historical knowledge of the history of personal and networked computing as it applies to the humanities.
  • Hands on experience with basic technological practices in the field
  • Extensive experience reviewing existing Digital Humanities projects
  • An understanding of what the Digital Humanities is and where it may and may not be helpful in the pursuit of their other research interests.
  • Read the rest of this entry »

English 3450a: Old English (Spring 2015)

Note: This was published to the wrong URL. See http://people.uleth.ca/~daniel.odonnell/Teaching/english-3450a-old-english-fall-2015 for the updated syllabus.


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