Updating Textpattern and Solving a Rewrite Problem

Just updated my CMS (Textpattern) to the latest version (6.4.2). I had to because the University just updated the PHP on the server and this broke the old install.

Everything worked great except for one thing: I could get it to work if I put the full URL to the index page in (i.e. http://people.uleth.ca/~daniel. Read the rest of this entry »


How to make a table wider in Google Docs

I’ve spent a frustrating couple of days trying to squeeze things into a Google Docs table that was too narrow for its content.

The problem was that while I could move individual columns within a table, I simply couldn’t find the way of widening the outer boundaries of the table—i.e. moving the leftmost border to the left or the rightmost border to the right. Making things worse, I had been able to do it a couple of weeks ago. But nothing I was doing seemed to work now.

The trick turned out to be remarkably easy, though it points to a UI problem in Google Docs. Basically, Google Docs allows you to adjust column width in two different ways: by reaching up into the measurement ribbon at the top of the document and moving columns there (when you do this, you see a left-right arrow cursor [⇔] that has not been captured in the screenshot):

Read the rest of this entry »

How to write to text pattern

This document is a quick primer on using TextPattern, the Content Management System that controls my web pages. It covers the basics only.

Log in

After I have made you an account, you should receive login information in an email. Read the rest of this entry »


Sweetcaptcha WordPress Plugin deliberately creates popups

For a little while, I’ve been surprised by popups on my blog site dpod.kakelbont.ca (tl;dr: they don’t happen any more because I removed the SweetCaptcha plugin).

I’m not quite sure the contexts in which I’d been seeing them, but for whatever reason I thought they were coming as an artefact of something else: a bottom banner on my cellphone that I was accidentally touching or something similar.

But today it became clear that there really was Something Amiss. When I checked on both Chrome and Firefox, it was happening the first time I clicked on any page link in my site. It took a little while googling for a solution (turns out a lot of people want popups to appear in their Wordpress sites and most things I found were about how to make them happen).

Read the rest of this entry »

The uleth ezproxy server

Paperpile allows users to put in their library’s ezproxy server. This allows the system to search for PDFs licensed through the university library, especially when off campus.

Although Paperpile has proxy addresses for a lot of Canadian universities, it doesn’t have one for Lethbridge. After doing some digging, I think I was able to find out ours:

http://ezproxy.alu.talonline.ca/login?url=$@

I found information on the server here (specifically about how to log in to JSTOR using it). Read the rest of this entry »


Adding annotation functions to my blog via hypothes.is

I’ve just added hypothes.is as a default annotation engine to my blog.

This means that users can now make annotations on every page on my site using the hypothes.is platform (account required).

The hypothes.is tab

You can see the hypothes.is tab in the right-hand margin of your browser window.

Read the rest of this entry »

The CASRAI CRediT Typology

This is just a reminder (and template) for me to use for the CASRAI credit typology:

Definitions

  • Conceptualization: Ideas; formulation or evolution of overarching research goals and aims.
  • Methodology: Development or design of methodology; creation of models
  • Software: Programming, software development; designing computer programs; implementation of the computer code and supporting algorithms; testing of existing code components.
  • Validation: Verification, whether as a part of the activity or separate, of the overall replication/reproducibility of results/experiments and other research outputs.
  • Read the rest of this entry »

OWA workflow

I recently switched to using Microsoft’s Outlook Web Application (OWA), a component of Office 365) for my email.

This was not something I wanted to do, but I am working extremely hard at delegating secretarial tasks to free up writing and research time and since OWA is what the university uses, and since I can’t forward my university’s voicemail to Gmail, switching to OWA makes the most sense in terms of allowing a proxy to handle most of my email.

Why OWA is an awful application

There are lots of bad things about this.

Read the rest of this entry »

Using find and rsync to extract files from a directory and move them

The context

I use hypothes.is for annotating PDFs (and websites). This works best, however, if the PDFs are online somewhere.

I use Zotero and Paperpile for citation management. Zotero in particular, stores all the PDFs that I collect via my bibliography locally in a very fragmented directory structure (each entry in the bibliography manager is its own directory, meaning in my case, the PDFs are spread over 7000 sub-directories.

The problem

So what I want to do is the following:

  1. find and extract all downloaded PDFs in my Zotero folders
  2. upload them to a (private) bibliographic server, where I can use hypothes. Read the rest of this entry »

Uleth identity/branding information and locations

This is just a quick note to myself so I can find these &*^&%$#!!@ things.

The official colours


OWA Ninja Notes

I’m in the process of seeing how to extract the most efficiency out of Office 365’s mail app, OWA. I’ll use this blog posting for notes for this (not always easily overseen) app.

I’m switching to OWA from Inbox. This is not by choice: OWA has better delegation properties than Inbox has (though Gmail has pretty good delegation properties). More importantly, OWA is what my university uses for faculty mail, so it is better integrated with the calendar system and it seems to be the only way that my PA (or I) can access my voicemail.

One last part of this: I’m preparing for a fairly intensive upcoming year in terms of research and grant writing; the main reason I’m working on this at all, is that I’ve decided to try and slay the email beast. So everything written here is also focussed on minimising time and attention, automation, and, especially, delegation.

Read the rest of this entry »

How to backup an Ubuntu system using Dropbox

How you do this depends on whether you are setting it up for the first time or want to restore already-saved files from Dropbox to their correct place.

First time (i.e. you have never used dropbox to backup your files)

  1. Install dropbox
  2. In the terminal, navigate to the Dropbox folder (probably ~/Dropbox)
  3. Soft link to each directory you want to backup in dropbox (i.e. ln -s ~/Documents ., ln -s ~/Desktop . Read the rest of this entry »

Using hypothes.is to annotate print books

hypothes.is is a web-based annotation service that I was recently introduced to by my friend Maryann Martone. It is extremely handy for taking notes while web-browsing, and, since it annotates PDFs, I also use it for things like preparing for Faculty-Board negotations regarding the U of L contract.

Today, however, I experimented with a way of using Hypothes.is to annotate print books:

  1. locate the book in an online library catalogue, Google Books, or an online bookseller like Amazon.com or Chapters.ca
  2. write notes beginning with the page number you are commenting on/quoting from in hypothes. Read the rest of this entry »

Advanced search functions for Google Inbox

Here’s a link to some advanced search functions for gmail and Google Inbox: https://support.google.com/mail/answer/7190?hl=en

Not mentioned in the page are some useful additions for use with Inbox:

1) You can negate a term by putting a – in front of the flag (e.g. -is:done) means select messages that are not done.
2) You can use terms like “done” which are not listed in the page: after:2016/01/05 is:unread -is:done selects all mail after January 5, 2016 that is unread and not marked as being done.

Read the rest of this entry »

Emailing previous semester classes

In a previous post, I discussed how to customise your class space and class mailing lists at the U of L. Something I didn’t mention there is that you can email previous semester classes as well, if you know how the mailing list aliases work.

Every current semester class can be emailed by the instructor and his/her delegates at an address in the following format: SUBJNNNNSuleth.ca@, where SUBJ is the four letter subject code for the class (e.g. in most of my cases, engl for English), NNNN is the four digit number (e.g. 3450 in the case of Old English), and S is the section letter (usually a, but could be n for evening classes, or a latter between a and n for additional sections). So in semesters when I am teaching Old English, for example, I can email the class using the address engl3450auleth. Read the rest of this entry »


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