English 1900j: Introduction to English Language and Literature (Fall 2012)

English 1900 is the introductory course in our department. It is a prerequisite for all higher level courses.

The purpose of English 1900 is to introduce students to the study of literature and to provide opportunity to practice analytical reading, thinking, and writing about texts.

This section of English 1900 will focus particularly on discovery: uncovering our (often unrealised) critical responses to texts and developing these into compelling and interesting arguments.

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English 4400n: Digital Humanities (Fall 2012)

English 4400n: Digital Humanities is a senior seminar on the digital revolution and the effect it is having on the way we communicate, research, and teach. Most of the course will be concerned with the mechanisms and effects of what we might describe as the second Internet revolution—the growth of cloud-based, often socially-network-oriented, services, applications, and repositories that are radically changing economic, social, and research culture and practices.

By the end of the course, students should have

  • A grounded historical knowledge of the history of personal and networked computing as it applies to the humanities.
  • Hands on experience with basic technological practices in the field
  • Extensive experience reviewing existing Digital Humanities projects
  • An understanding of what the Digital Humanities is and where it may and may not be helpful in the pursuit of their other research interests.

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Draft Once per Week Class Schedule in Textile Markup


table(syllabus).
|*Week*|*Date*|*Topic*|
|-(week#wk1). *1*| *Thur. 6/9*|   |
|/2-(week#wk2). *2*|-(announcement). *Tue. 11/9*| (announcement). *Last day to add/drop* |
|*Thur. 13/9*|   |
|-(week#wk3). *3*| *Thur. 20/9*|   |
|-(week#wk4). *4*| *Thur. 27/9*|   |
|-(week#wk5). *5*| *Thur. 4/10*|   |
|-(week#wk6). *6*| *Thur. 11/10*|   |
|-(week#wk7). *7*| *Thur. 8/10*|   |
|-(week#wk8). *8*| *Thur. 25/10*|   |
|-(week#wk9). *9*| *Thur. 1/11*|   |
|-(week#wk10). *10*| *Thur. 8/11*|   |
|-(week#wk11). *11*| *Thur. 15/11*|  |
|-(week#wk12). *12*| *Thur. 22/11*|   |
|-(week#wk13). *13*| *Thur. 29/11*|   |
|/2-(test#exam). *Exam*|(test). *Sunday 13/12* |(test). *Essay 3 Due on Turnitin* (Midnight) |
|(test). *Mon. 10/12-Tue. 18/12*|(test). *Final Exam (Moodle)* |

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Draft Tuesday-Thursday Fall Semester Class Schedule in Textile Markup


table(syllabus).
|*Week*|*Date*|*Topic*|
|/2-(week#wk1). *1*|(holiday). *Tue. 4/9*|(holiday). *No class*|
| *Thur. 6/9*|   |
|/3-(week#wk2). *2*|/2-. *Tue. 11/9*|   |
|(announcement). *Last day to add/drop* |
|*Thur. 13/9*|   |
|/2-(week#wk3). *3*| *Tue. 18/9*|   |
|*Thur. 20/9*|   |
|/2-(test#wk4). *4*| *Tue. 25/9*|   |
|*Thur. 27/9*|   |
|/2-(test#wk5). *5*| *Tue. 2/10*|   |
|*Thur. 4/10*|   |
|/2-(week#wk6). *6*| *Tue. 9/10*|   |
|*Thur. 11/10*|   |
|/2-(week#wk7). *7*|*Tue. 16/10*|   |
|*Thur. 8/10*|   |
|/2-(week#wk8). *8*| *Tue. 23/10*|   |
|*Thur. 25/10*|   |
|/2-(week#wk9). *9*| *Tue. 30/10*|   |
|*Thur. 1/11*|   |
|/2-(week#wk10). *10*| *Tue. 6/11*|   |
|*Thur. 8/11*|   |
|/2-(week#wk11). *11*| *Tue. 13/11* |   |
|*Thur. 15/11*|  |
|/2-(week#wk12). *12*| *Tue. 20/11*|   |
|*Thur. 22/11*|   |
|/2-(week#wk13). *13*| *Tue. 27/11*|   |
|*Thur. 29/11*|   |
|/2-(week#wk13). *14*| *Tue. 4/12*|   |
|*Thur. 6/12*|   |
|/2-(test#exam). *Exam*|(test). *Sunday 13/12* |(test). *Essay 3 Due on Turnitin* (Midnight) |
|(test). *Mon. 10/12-Tue. 18/12*|(test). *Final Exam (Moodle)* |

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MySQL cheatsheet

Some reminders about basic dump and restore for MySQL.

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Blogs, Wikis, and LMSs. Some notes on my practice

Ryan Cordell and I had been exchanging tweets on the use of blogs, wikis, and the like in class. Since 140 characters is good for many things, but not this, I promised him I’d write up a quick description of the practice I’ve developed over the last few years.

The context for this is the Moodle Learning Management System (LMS), which I’ve been using in its 1.x and 2.x versions. There’s no reason why you couldn’t do this with loose wiki, blogging, and microblogging systems. But I’m still reluctant to require students to release their school work publicly.

Read the rest of this entry »


Should I keep this blog? Should I retweet yours? Scholarly responsibility and new publication models

I’ve been engaged with on-line scholarly publication for almost two decades. For a while in the middle of the first decade of this century in fact, my most popular and most often cited publication was a 1998 webpage describing my plans for an electronic edition of the Old English poem Caedmon’s Hymn  Read the rest of this entry »


The Lethbridge Journal Incubator: Leveraging the Educational Potential of the Scholarly Communication Process

The Lethbridge Journal incubator is an experiment in the sustainability of academic publishing. The incubator attempts to ensure this sustainability by aligning the publishing processes with the research, teaching, and service missions of the University. Instead of drawing resources away from these central missions, academic communication under this model become a resource that materially improves […]

Linked data, open data: Towards a semantic web of Anglo-Saxon England

International Society of Anglo-Saxonists (ISAS), July 29th-August 2, 2013, Dublin

The Visionary Cross would like to propose a roundtable or three paper panel on linked and open data in Anglo-Saxon studies for ISAS 2013. The goal of this panel would be to assess the current state of practice in the development of linked and open datasets and to explore future directions. This topic should be of interest to textual editors, cultural heritage curators, art historians, researchers working on dictionaries and other reference works.

If you would like to explore this topic contact, please contact Daniel O’Donnell (daniel.odonnell@uleth.ca) as soon as possible to discuss approaches. Session and paper proposals are due at the ISAS programme committee by September 13.


Call for Papers: Cultural, Textual, and Material Heritage in the Digital Age: Projects and Practices

The twentieth International Medieval Congress, Leeds, 1-4 July 2013

The rise of the Digital Humanities as an international, cross-disciplinary approach to humanistic scholarship presents exciting new challenges and opportunities.

Perhaps one of the most exciting of these is the convergence of interest among textual editors, art historians, archaeologists, museum and library curatorial staff, government agencies, and commercial entities in what can be broadly described as issues in the representation and research of Cultural, Textual, and Material Heritage.

This call is for papers addressing current and future practices and opportunities in this area. What are the interesting projects? What are the interesting technologies, methodologies, and business models? How will this convergence play out in the short and medium term?

Read the rest of this entry »


Call for Participants: New Digital Paradigms in Anglo-Saxon Studies

International Society of Anglo-Saxonists (ISAS), July 29th-August 2, 2013, Dublin

Anglo-Saxon studies, and medieval studies more generally, has always been a pioneering discipline in the use of digital technology. From early projects like the Dictionary of Old English and Electronic Beowulf through more recent contributions such as the Anglo-Saxon Cluster and DigiPal, Anglo-Saxonists have always been ready to adopt promising new technologies and approaches when these have been able to help us in our research and teaching. Read the rest of this entry »


Linked data, open data: Towards a semantic web of Anglo-Saxon England

International Society of Anglo-Saxonists (ISAS), July 29th-August 2, 2013, Dublin The Visionary Cross would like to propose a roundtable or three paper panel on linked and open data in Anglo-Saxon studies for ISAS 2013. The goal of this panel would be to assess the current state of practice in the development of linked and open […]

Call for Papers: Cultural, Textual, and Material Heritage in the Digital Age: Projects and Practices

The twentieth International Medieval Congress, Leeds, 1-4 July 2013 The rise of the Digital Humanities as an international, cross-disciplinary approach to humanistic scholarship presents exciting new challenges and opportunities. Perhaps one of the most exciting of these is the convergence of interest among textual editors, art historians, archaeologists, museum and library curatorial staff, government agencies, […]

Call for participants: New Digital Paradigms for Anglo-Saxon Studies

International Society of Anglo-Saxonists (ISAS), July 29th-August 2, 2013, Dublin Anglo-Saxon studies, and medieval studies more generally, has always been a pioneering discipline in the use of digital technology. From early projects like the Dictionary of Old English and Electronic Beowulf through more recent contributions such as the Anglo-Saxon Cluster and DigiPal, Anglo-Saxonists have always […]

Going LoC(o) with Zotero: Scratching the inner librarian

Photo of my home office in 2005 (used for my Pseudo Society talk at Kalamazoo, “Using Computers to Improve Efficiency in Research and Teaching”)

I have always been a very messy person, especially in my work area. Here for example, is a not unrepresentative photo of my home office in 2005 (since one normally doesn’t take pictures of messy rooms, this is the only one I have: I took it to use as a slide in my 2005 Pseudo Society talk at the Kalamazoo Congress on Medieval Studies, “Using computers to improve efficiency in research and teaching”).

Perhaps oddly, however, this same messiness has never extended to my bibliography. Ever since I began university as an undergraduate in 1985, I have kept very careful bibliographic records. Read the rest of this entry »


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