Testing the GRAND-DH Website

GRAND-DH is the Digital Humanities project of the GRAND National Centre of Excellence.

This is a test to see that the blog aggregator is working.

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On the Road: Adventures in Public Digital Humanities (Kim Martin on the DH Maker bus at the University of Lethbridge)

In 2013, Kim and two friends, Ryan Hunt and Beth Compton, purchased a 1991 school bus, which they have since converted into Ontario’s first mobile makerspace: the DH MakerBus (Makerbus.ca).

What started as a passion project quickly became an area of academic interest, and Kim now works to showcase the public benefits of humanities education in London and beyond. She is a co-lead on the Humanities Matters Bus Tour and is currently implementing a local chapter of 4Humanities in London, Ontario.

This paper discusses her experiences in establishing this project.

Speaker: Kim Martin, Library and Information Science, Western University
Date: Monday, September 29, 2014
Location: D-631
Time: 12:00 – 1:00 p.m. Read the rest of this entry »


Blogging in Moodle

In many of my classes, I ask students to blog within Moodle. Blogs within Moodle are visible to the whole community. It is also possible, using an RSS feed, to broadcast your blog outside Moodle.

There are two parts to using blogs in Moodle: composing blogs and reading the entries of others.


Managing class webpages and mailing lists at the University of Lethbridge

For years, every class at the University of Lethbridge has been given webspace and a mailing list. While the mailing list is well-known to instructors (it is the list “XXXXNNNNx@uleth.ca” that you use to make announcements to the class as a whole), the webspace is far less well known. This document (mostly a reminder to myself) shows you how you can use online tools to manage this.


English 4600b/5600b: Beowulf (Fall 2014)

About this course

English 4600b/5600b is a reading course in Old English focussing on Beowulf. A necessary prerequisite is previous experience reading Old English, the language of Anglo-Saxon England (c. 450-1200 CE).

Important note: If you are not an English major, you may find the course is currently blocked for enrolment. This is a temporary issue: there is plenty of space in the class if you wish to take it. I can guarantee there will be space for you.


English 4400n/5500n: Digital Humanities (Fall 2014)

About the course

English 4400n: Digital Humanities is a senior seminar on the digital revolution and the effect it is having on the way we communicate, research, and teach. Most of the course will be concerned with the mechanisms and effects of what we might describe as the second Internet revolution—the growth of cloud-based, often socially-network-oriented, services, applications, and repositories that are radically changing economic, social, and research culture and practices.

By the end of the course, students should have

  • A grounded historical knowledge of the history of personal and networked computing as it applies to the humanities.
  • Hands on experience with basic technological practices in the field
  • Extensive experience reviewing existing Digital Humanities projects
  • An understanding of what the Digital Humanities is and where it may and may not be helpful in the pursuit of their other research interests.
  • Read the rest of this entry »

English 1900e: Introduction to English Language and Literature (Fall 2014)

About this course

English 1900 is the introductory course in our department. It is a prerequisite for all higher level courses.

The purpose of English 1900 is to introduce students to the study of literature and to provide opportunity to practice analytical reading, thinking, and writing about texts.

This section of English 1900 will focus particularly on discovery and communication: uncovering our (often unrealised) critical responses to texts and developing these into compelling and interesting arguments.


SGS Examination procedures

Because I always need to look this up in the middle of the graduate studies handbook, the procedures for defence…

The forms

All forms can be emailed to sgs@uleth. Read the rest of this entry »


Two tips that will improve the lives of all students and researchers in the Humanities and Social Sciences

Introduction

A recent question on Linked-in asked how important the formatting guides for journals are in preparing submissions.

Although this question was about submitting to journals, its context is relevant to all students and researchers in the Social Sciences and Humanities (although the problem also exists in the sciences, the solutions there are in some cases different). Humanities and Social Science study in University is largely about the collection of bibliography and the presentation of findings in written form. And that invariably involves questions of formatting: different disciplines and even different journals (or for students, instructors) within a discipline can require work to be submitted in quite different styles.


More on Aauthors and Aalphabetical placement

In an earlier post today, I discussed some of the economic implications of having a last name beginning early in the alphabet in disciplines that traditionally order the authors on multi-author papers alphabetically.

I’ve since looked up the original paper (Einav, Liran, and Leeat Yariv. 2006. “What’s in a Surname? The Effects of Surname Initials on Academic Success.” The Journal of Economic Perspectives 20 (1): 175–88). This is more startling than I thought.

First of all, from the authors’ own description:

Read the rest of this entry »

A is for Aardvark and author. The economic implications of having a last name with an early letter in the alphabet

In many disciplines, when more than one researcher contributes to a paper, the authors are listed in terms of the relative contribution: the first author is assumed to have done the most work, the second the second most, and so on until the last position, which is often as prestigious as first.

In other disciplines, however, the tradition is to order author names alphabetically.

This can be unfair to authors whose names come later in the alphabet, because citation conventions for multiple author contributions usually spell out the names of only the first two or three authors.

But it turns out it can also have career and financial implications. As Marusic, Bosnjak, et al. (see?) report:

Read the rest of this entry »

The credit line

I think it is time to get rid of authorship altogether, at least in research communication.


Dangerous bug in Moodle

Just discovered a dangerous bug in the Moodle essay question template.

About the essay question edit screen

When you write an essay question in Moodle, there are a couple of different boxes on the form:

The question goes in the top. Then you have the “General response” (something the student usually can see when the results are released). Then the “Response Template,” which can be used for including text you want to appear in the answer box as soon as the question loads for the student (e.g. text like “Type your essay here”). And finally a grader box, where you can include tips for the grader (this shows up on the grading screen right above the student’s answer. Read the rest of this entry »


University of Lethbridge Tenure Track job: Postcolonial or Modernism, DH welcome (Deadline April 15)

The Department of English at the University of Lethbridge invites applications for a probationary (tenure-track) position at the Assistant Professor rank to begin 1 July 2014, subject to budgetary approval. The position is in the area of Twentieth-Century Literature with specialization in either Post-Colonial Literature or Modernism.

Applicants should have a Ph.D. at or near completion and teaching experience at the university level. The University aspires to hire individuals who have demonstrated considerable potential for excellence in teaching, research and scholarship. New faculty members are eligible to apply for university funding in support of research and scholarly activities.

The position is open to all qualified applicants, although preference will be given to Canadian citizens and permanent residents of Canada. Read the rest of this entry »


Academic Suicide

The so-called “college paper” has been a debated topic practically since its initial inception. A recent class statement brought the debate to the forefront of my mind. Professor O’Donnell stated, in a tone of bemusement, that his students tend to perform better on the blog assignments than on their actual papers. It does seem odd that a discrepancy exists between two writing exercises. However, the answer formed almost immediately within my thoughts and has expanded through the discussion of prescriptive rules versus descriptive. The reason students are so terrible at writing the “college paper” boils down to differences between prescriptive rules and descriptive rules. With that I commit myself to academic suicide by breaking the general guidelines and prescriptive rules of academic writing and adhering only to grammatical prescriptive rules and a more formal dialect to explain the phenomenon of why students are incapable of writing the traditional North American college Read the rest of this entry »


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