Election Results 2016

The 2016 elections for the GO::DH executive are concluded. The winners, in alphabetical order, are Elena Gonzalez-Blanco Élika Ortega Thomas G. Padilla Roopika Risam All members were elected to a two year term. Four other members of the executive have terms that expire in january 2017. They are: Gimena del Rio Alex Gil Dan O’Donnell Padmini […]

GO::DH Executive Committee Elections – Candidate Profiles

Global Outlook::Digital Humanities is holding its third Executive Committee elections. According to the approved bylaws that establish procedures by which GO::DH is governed, four out of eight of the seats on the executive committee are up for election this year. Each executive serves a two year (renewable) term. The election will be open for members […]

How to export Garageband files so that they work in other Digital Audio Workstations

Garageband is a Digital Audio Workstation for MacIntosh. It is easy to use and comes with lots of loops and sounds you can use in creating music.

Garageband is only available for Mac, however, and if you plan to collaborate with others, then you need to find some way of getting your tracks out of Garageband in a way that will allow other systems to use the files. The best file format for doing this is .wav/.aiff (which are the same thing). Every DAW worth the name should be able to import and export this file type.

This is not something you can do with Share/Export: while it is possible to export a Garageband project as a . Read the rest of this entry »


Using hypothes.is to annotate print books

hypothes.is is a web-based annotation service that I was recently introduced to by my friend Maryann Martone. It is extremely handy for taking notes while web-browsing, and, since it annotates PDFs, I also use it for things like preparing for Faculty-Board negotations regarding the U of L contract.

Today, however, I experimented with a way of using Hypothes.is to annotate print books:

  1. locate the book in an online library catalogue, Google Books, or an online bookseller like Amazon.com or Chapters.ca
  2. write notes beginning with the page number you are commenting on/quoting from in hypothes. Read the rest of this entry »

How to retard science? Set up a grant programme. From Leo Szilard’s Mark Gable Foundation (1961).

A story about how to wreck science, from Szilard, Leo. 1961. “The Mark Gable Foundation.” In The Voice of the Dolphins and Other Stories, 117–30. Stanford University Press. https://books.google.ca/books?id=xm2mAAAAIAAJ&lpg=PP1&dq=The%20Voice%20of%20the%20Dolphins%3A%20And%20Other%20Stories&pg=PA121#v=onepage&q&f=false

“I have earned a very large sum of money,” said Mr. Read the rest of this entry »


Harpers on the wonders of the telegraph and typewriter… and the rightful place of philologists.

From the conclusion of a great article in Harper’s on the Telegraph :

The immense extension of the general telegraphic system, and its common use for business and social correspondence and the dissemination of public intelligence, are far more important to the community than any of these incidental applications of the system. The telegraph system is extending much more rapidly than the railroad system, and is probably exerting even a greater influence upon the mental development of the people than the railroad is exerting in respect to the material and physical prosperity of the country. It has penetrated almost every mind with a new sense of the vastnessof distance and the value of time. It is commonly said that it has annihilated time and space—and this is true in a sense; but in a deeper sense it has magnified both, for it has been the means of expanding vastly the inadequate conceptions which we form of space and distance, and of giving a significance to the idea Read the rest of this entry »


Advanced search functions for Google Inbox

Here’s a link to some advanced search functions for gmail and Google Inbox: https://support.google.com/mail/answer/7190?hl=en

Not mentioned in the page are some useful additions for use with Inbox:

1) You can negate a term by putting a – in front of the flag (e.g. -is:done) means select messages that are not done.
2) You can use terms like “done” which are not listed in the page: after:2016/01/05 is:unread -is:done selects all mail after January 5, 2016 that is unread and not marked as being done.

Read the rest of this entry »

Advanced Old English (Spring 2016)

About this course

Advanced Old English is a reading course in Old English focussing on Beowulf. A necessary prerequisite is previous experience reading Old English, the language of Anglo-Saxon England (c. 450-1200 CE). At the U of L, this experience is acquired through English 3450.

Important note: This course is being offered in the form of Independent Studies. The Dean’s office has agreed to waive restrictions on Independent Studies that affect degree requirements for students taking this course. These include the maximum number of Independent Studies you can count towards your degree and restrictions on the use of Independent Studies courses to satisfy distribution requirements at fourth year for English majors. Please see me if you want to take this course but cannot because of some restriction on Independent Studies in your programme.

Read the rest of this entry »

English 3601a: Chaucer (Spring 2016)

About this course

English 3601 introduces students to the works of Geoffrey Chaucer, the best known English poet of the high middle ages. This course is a companion to English 3401, Medieval Literature, and English 3450, Old English.

This section takes a constructionist and collaborative approach to student learning. Students will be expected to take responsibility for the direction of their learning under the mentorship of the instructor.


Emailing previous semester classes

In a previous post, I discussed how to customise your class space and class mailing lists at the U of L. Something I didn’t mention there is that you can email previous semester classes as well, if you know how the mailing list aliases work.

Every current semester class can be emailed by the instructor and his/her delegates at an address in the following format: SUBJNNNNSuleth.ca@, where SUBJ is the four letter subject code for the class (e.g. in most of my cases, engl for English), NNNN is the four digit number (e.g. 3450 in the case of Old English), and S is the section letter (usually a, but could be n for evening classes, or a latter between a and n for additional sections). So in semesters when I am teaching Old English, for example, I can email the class using the address engl3450auleth. Read the rest of this entry »


World is a better place 3. Career 0.

The last couple of days have been, by any measure, a huge success.

A visit by Dot Porter to Lethbridge got my DH class revved up and also led to a breakthrough in our understanding of the Visionary Cross project and a blog posting yesterday that seems to be making its way around the DHosphere.

Over the weekend, the executive and members of GO::DH led to the development of a report on diversity and intercultural communications issues that also seems to be hitting a nerve

And finally, there was some cool twitter chatter about my ongoing Unessay research.

Or actually, I shouldn’t say that it was a huge success by “any measure.” In fact, it was a wash, as far as career progress went, since none of these are official citations or refereed publications. Although, as I’ve argued elsewhere, Canadian universities are better than many in their ability to use non-bibliometric measures of success, we’re not that good at it. Read the rest of this entry »


Well that’s that. Solving (?) the VC model and workflow

Yesterday, Dot Porter, one of the leads on the Visionary Cross project visited Lethbridge for a project meeting (and to speak to my DH class). The main purpose of her meeting was to plan the work that needs to happen on the Digital Library side of the project.

This is a core issue for us. As we say on the front page:

The Visionary Cross project is an international, multidisciplinary research project whose principle objective is the development of a new kind of digital archive and edition of texts and objects associated with the Visionary Cross tradition in Anglo-Saxon England.

Taking its cue from recent developments in digital editorial theory and practice, the project takes a data-centric, distributed, and generalisable approach to the representation of cultural heritage texts, objects, and contexts in order to encourage broad scholarly and popular engagement with its material.

The important things here are that it is an archive-edition: it is data-centric, distributed, Read the rest of this entry »


Well that’s that. Solving (?) the VC model and workflow

Yesterday, Dot Porter, one of the leads on the Visionary Cross project visited Lethbridge for a project meeting (and to speak to my DH class). The main purpose of her meeting was to plan the work that needs to happen on the Digital Library side of the project. This is a core issue for us. […]

Pitch and time stretching in Ardour

In the old (analogue) days, these were related issues. The way you shifted pitch was by speeding up or slowing down the tape; fixing speed (e.g. Beats per Minute) involved changing pitch. Perhaps the most famous example of this is in the middle of Strawberry Fields where George Martin and Geoff Emerick were asked by John Lennon to splice together takes in different keys and tempos—which they did by speeding up the slower version (in A) and slowing down the faster one (in B) and hoping nobody noticed the slight jump.

Nowadays, of course, they can be independent (but don’t have to be). You can adjust pitch while maintaining speed, and adjust speed while maintaining pitch.

Here are some quick notes to myself on pitch and time shifting in Ardour, based on experiments I did yesterday. Read the rest of this entry »


Archaeology as Installation: Jerusalem’s Temple Mount and the Davidson Center for Exhibition and Virtual Reconstruction. Lecture by Lisa Snyder (UCLA). November 24.

Lisa Snyder from the UCLA Institute for Digital Research and Education will be in Lethbridge to speak to my Digital Humanities class on Monday November 23, 2015. She has also agreed to give a second talk, “Archaeology as Installation: Jerusalem’s Temple Mount and the Davidson Center for Exhibition and Virtual Reconstruction.”

The talk will take place on Tuesday 24, 2015 10:50-12:05 in Room L1170a (Linc building).

At the heart of archaeology is interpretation, and one of the greatest challenges for an archaeologist is communicating the results of their excavations with both the general public and other researchers. In 1999, the Israel Antiquities Authority turned to the Urban Simulation Team at UCLA to address this challenge through a landmark installation for the Davidson Center in Jerusalem. Since the Center opened in 2001, visitors to the site have had the opportunity to take a virtual tour of the reconstruction model with an archaeologist guide in an interactive Read the rest of this entry »


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